Ascending Grindslow Knoll in Edale

Ascending Grindslow Knoll in Edale

We decided to climb Grindslow Knoll on one of the warmest days of the year but the following day was even hotter so on reflection I’m glad we did it when we did.  J

Parking in Edale is always fun as it’s such a busy place with walkers everywhere.  You can attempt to get in to the council pay & display which is heaving at weekends or there are two other car parks near to the station.  One is the station car park which again is pay & display the other further down from the station car park is manned but there was nobody there when we visited on Sunday.

So parking was free!

Edale at the foot of Grindslow Knoll
Edale at the foot of Grindslow Knoll

On exiting the car park follow the road down past the Penny Pot café and turn left at the junction.  Follow the road up the hill past the church until you’re standing looking at the Old Nags Head pub.  A glance to the left will lead you to the start of the famous Pennine Way.

This is where your ascent begins.

A Sheep on Grindslow Knoll
A Sheep on Grindslow Knoll

Follow the path alongside the Grinds Brook until you reach the gate at the top.  There you need to head right across a field which lies at the base of Grindslow Knoll.  I found this hill a little challenging as it’s quite steep and in a way prepares you for what lies ahead.

At the top right corner of the field you will find an access gate to the foot of Grindslow Knoll.  I strongly advise you to wear stout footwear as most of the route consists of loose stone chippings and it’s easy to slip.

I took the climb very steadily as it was making me huff and it was a challenge for my legs too.  Frequent breaks are advised if for nothing else but to take in the stunning scenery.  The panoramic and far reaching views of Edale, Mam Tor, Back Tor, Lose Hill & Win Hill are breath taking in themselves.

Part of the path up Grindslow Knoll
Part of the path up Grindslow Knoll

The higher you climb the steeper the incline becomes and I really had to push myself to climb the steps to the summit.  Just before you reach the top there is a bit of a scramble over some rocks and I found David’s hand in pulling me up very helpful.

When I finally reached the top the reward was amazing 360 degree views.  It certainly made all the huffing and puffing worth while.

I made sure I sat there taking the views in for a while before my descent.  🙂

Edale viewed from Grindslow Knoll
Edale viewed from Grindslow Knoll

As we sat at the top there were people who had walked up Jacobs Ladder coming over the top.  I noted that the fields at the bottom must have been a quog as their footwear and lower legs were dirty.  Something we didn’t have to contend with.

Whilst this walk may only be just over 5km it really does challenge your fitness levels with the steepness of the pathway and I felt that I’d had a very good workout.


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